Apple’s New Epoch Time for WebComponentsLastUsed

The latest Java update for Lion 2012-003 ( which after 3 revisions is still called JavaForOSX-1.0 in Software Update – oh, Apple! But I digress…) will turn off Java if it hasn’t been used in 30 days (or so I hear). It accomplishes this by writing a value to the WebComponentsLastUsed in ~/Library/Preferences/ByHost/

It used to be enough to have WebComponentsEnabled set to True, but now WebComponentsLastUsed is required or the unclickable “Plugin-Disabled” button will be shown in Safari’s lower right corner (it totally looks clickable yeah?)

If you work at a company that requires Java web components to be on for things like timesheets, making sure Java stays on helps to avoid getting help desk calls.

So I needed to figure out how this value was computed, it was too small to be the Unix epoch (seconds since January 1, 1970), so I did some sleuthing, some comparitive analysis (just to sound fancy), and figured out it is the number of seconds since January 1, 2001. To get this value you just need to get the Unix epoch and subtract the number of seconds since Jan 1, 2001.

Here’s the way to get this value in a BASH Terminal:

echo $(( $(date "+%s") - 978307200 ))

Toggling the check box in /Applications/Utilities/Java Preferences will reset the WebComponentsLastUsed value and you will find it very close to the value from Terminal.

Wasn’t that fun? The Der Flounder blog has a script using this method to turn on Java. He was a good sport to incorporate my code, too. He enlightened me with his UUID scripting code, so share and share alike, I say.

Bonus link for Apple’s other epoch time, for iTunes’ XML Play Date field: January 1, 1904 – that’s the first year of the last century with a leap year, so says Filemaker! ;)

OpenDNS does not prevent infection of Flashback

While reading the froth around Flashback I came upon this shameless bit of self promotion from OpenDNS: Worried about Mac malware? Just set up OpenDNS.

What, Me Worried?

It’s got some amazing claims:

"All Mac users should switch to OpenDNS now to prevent infection"

A lot of people have commented:
19 pingbacks from various regurgitators: FairerPlatform, Tech 3K, chicagogeek, News4iPhone, ZBlog!, Free Nulled Apps, Tech News, Tutto App, When’s the next Iphone out?,, iphone 4S issues, Apple Related,, IT Blogger Blog, Apple Stocks, iHelpBoard, and The Apple Lounge

One very enthusiastic supporter:

"We should change the world for better"

And then my comment:

Just asking...

It’s still awaiting moderation?! Whaaaaa?!

[sarcasm]Why you no like me Allison? Is my English no too good? Do I NOT WRITE IN ENOUGH CAPS?!?! Why you no want make world for better?! Why no share my important tip?[/sarcasm]

Update Java folks. Relying on a DNS company to block DNS queries is just dumb. How do they know what all the Command and Control domains are? Those things can change at whim and I wouldn’t make DNS lookups my first line of defense, it certainly isn’t preventative. If you don’t have your computer updated you can get compromised. Even if you do update, until Apple gets things patched quicker, even that’s not good enough, you need some protection, Sophos makes a good free product. Get it.

Also, if you think “I only go to good clean sites”. I’ll tell you, that you can never know. This site got hacked because of combination of a Dreamhost database compromise and  Wordpress vulnerabilities. That’s been taken care (otherwise you’d be redirected to or something like that — gawd, of all the hacks… — and the domain didn’t even work! ). But all it takes is some PHP/Wordpress compromise and your site could be serving up malware. So be safe, be vigilant, and don’t think that someone else is going to protect you because they don’t let your computer talk to strangers (yes, OpenDNS I’m talking to you.)