jpt + jamf uapi = backupJamf-scripts

Jamf UAPI: JSON Only

I am a creature of habit, no doubt, however sometimes you must get out of your comfort zone. The Jamf Universal API (UAPI) is one such case, it is JSON only and not XM. Those tried and true xpath snippets will no longer work with JSON, in fact what tool do you use with JSON? macOS really doesn’t have a good built-in JSON tool and if your scripts are client side do you really want to have jq as a dependency? Good thing I wrote a JSON parser you can embed in your scripts this summer! In fact, when I finished writing my JSON power tool jpt, I needed to find some practical examples to demonstrate its utility. Looking at the UAPI it’s clear some parts are still a work-in-progress, however the endpoint for scripts is actually really good. It gives you everything in one go almost like a database query. That should made backing up scripts a breeze!

backupJamf-scripts. boom.

If you’ve used the Classic API from Jamf, it is a 1:1 ratio of scripts to API calls: 2 scripts? 2 API calls via curl. 200 scripts? 200 API calls via curl. The new Universal API reduces that down to 1 call to get everything (plus one call to get the token), it’s super fast and I love it. Check out backupJamf-scripts.command in my newly minted jamfTools repo on GitHub for a working demostration of both the Jamf UAPI and jpt’s in-script JSON handling. I hope you like it!

jpt + jamf uapi = scripts downloading scripts

Jamf & FileVault 2: Tips & Tricks (and more)

Raiders of the Lost Feature Requests

So there’s this old feature request at Jamf Nation (stop me if you’ve heard this one…) it’s almost 6 years old: Add ability to report on FV2 Recovery Keys (and/or access them via API) In fact, maybe you came here from there, watch out don’t loop! Continue!

The pain point is this: Keys are sent back to Jamf Pro (JSS) but then can only be gotten at manually/interactively through the web interface, not via API nor another method. For cases of mass migration to another JSS it sure would be nice to move those keys over rather than decrypt/re-encrypt. Well, I’ve got a few insights regarding this that I’d like to share that may help. ‘Cuz hey it’s 2020 and we’ve learned that hoarding is just silly.

Firstly, it should be pointed out that neither ye olde “Recovery Key Redirection” payload nor it’s replacement “Recovery Key Escrow” are needed to get keys to the JSS. There is another method and it’s what is used by the built-in “Filevault Encryption” policy payload to get the keys back to your JSS. Jamf references this method in this old script at their GitHub. I revamped the core bits a couple years ago in a (nearly 7 year old) feature request: Manually Edit FileVault 2 Recovery Key

Telling the JSS Your Secrets

The takeaway from that is to realize we have a way to explicitly send keys to the JSS by placing 2 XML files in the /Library/Application Support/JAMF/run folder: file_vault_2_id.xml and file_vault_2_recovery_key.xml. Also note, Jamf has updated the process for the better in the last two years: a jamf recon (or two) is no longer required to send the key and validate it, instead JamfDaemon will send it immediately when both the files are detected. Which is nice, but it’s the subsequent recon validations where we have an opportunity to get grabby.

Cold Lamping, Hard Linking

So here’s the fun part: When recon occurs there’s lots of file traffic in /Library/Application Support/JAMF/tmp all sorts of transient scripts hit this folder. What we can do is make hard links to these files as they come in so when the link is removed in tmp another exists elsewhere and the file remains (just in our new location). EAGrabber.sh does exactly that (and a little bit more)

EAGrabber.sh can be easily modified to narrow it’s focus to the FileVault 2 key only, deleting the rest. What you do with the key is up to you: Send it somewhere else for safe keeping or keep it on device temporarily for a migration to another Jamf console. A script on the new JSS could then put that key on-disk into file_vault_2_recovery_key.xml file which will then import and validate, no decrypt/recrypt necessary. Hope this helps.

Cuidado ¡ Achtung ! Alert

Jamf admins take note: Do you have hard coded passwords in your extension attributes or scripts? If so, then all your scripts are belong to us. Now, go read Obfuscation vs. Encryption from Richard Purves. Read it? OK, now consider what happens if you were to add a routine to capture the output of ps aww along with a hard-linking loop like in EAGraber.sh. If you are passing API credentials from policies via parameter, then ps can capture those parameters and even if you try and obscure them, if we’ve captured the script we can de-obfuscate them. This is a good reason to be really careful with what your API accounts can do. If you have an API account with Computer record Read rights that gets passed into a script via policy and you use LAPS, then captured API credentials could be used to harvest LAPS passwords via API. Keep this in mind and we’ll see if any meaningful changes will occur in recon and/or the script running process in the future (if you open a ticket you can reference PI-006270 regarding API credentials in the process list). In the meantime make API actions as short lived as possible and cross your fingers that only you, good and noble #MacAdmins read this blog. 🤞

jpt: jamf examples pt. 2

Over in the MacAdmins’ #bash channel I saw a I question regarding how to get the Sharing states of Bluetooth devices from system_profiler. The most succinct answer was to awk out the values:

system_profiler SPBluetoothDataType 2> /dev/null | awk '/State: / {print $2}'
Disabled
Disabled
Disabled

If you are using this for a Jamf Extension Attribute, I suppose it’ll do if you never want to allow any of them to be Enabled, but what if Internet Sharing was OK but not File Sharing? How would you match your Smart Group to multiple lines of unlabeled values? How would you match the first two but not the last two… and what if there was another USB Bluetooth device, that would add extra rows. Hmmm…

The answer for me, outputting the service name and the state on the same line. Since there isn’t a consistent line count from State: going back the service name, using something like grep -B n to include n lines of preceding data isn’t going to work.

      Services:
          Bluetooth File Transfer:
              Folder other devices can browse: ~/Public
              When receiving items: Accept all without warning
              State: Disabled
          Bluetooth File Exchange:
              Folder for accepted items: ~/Downloads
              When other items are accepted: Save to location
              When receiving items: Accept all without warning
              State: Disabled
          Bluetooth Internet Sharing:
              State: Disabled

So you know what I say the answer to that is? That’s right, jpt the JSON Power Tool! It can parse the -json output from system_profiler in a more structured way and it allows for the discovery of as many applicable Bluetooth devices might be on the system.

Here’s a sample run with Internet Sharing turned On as well as Bluetooth Sharing turned On

file_browsing: disabled
object_push: enabled
internet_sharing: enabled

File Browsing is set to “Never Allow” but File Receiving is in the affirmative (Accept and Open, Accept and Save, or Ask). The addition of labels gives us the ability to create a Smart Group to match specific services like “file_browing: enabled” or any other combination thereof (perhaps internet_sharing should always be enabled, who am I to say what your requirements are!).

About the jpt

The JSON Power Tool (jpt) is a parser/manipulator for JSON documents written in Javascript and shell and can run standalone or embedded in your scripts bash or zsh and all the way back to OS X 10.4 Tiger! Check it out at: https://github.com/brunerd/jpt

jpt: jamf examples

jpt has some practical applications for the Jamf admin

Sanitizing Jamf Reports

Let’s say you’ve exported an Advanced Search, it’s got some interesting data you’d like to share, however there is personal data in it. Rather than re-running the report, why not blank out or remove those fields?

Here’s a sample file: advancedcomputersearch-2-raw.json

This an excerpt from one of the computer record:

{
"name": "Deathquark",
"udid": "2ca8977b-05a1-4cf0-9e06-24c4aa8115bc",
"Managed": "Managed",
"id": 2,
"Computer_Name": "Deathquark",
"Last_Inventory_Update": "2020-11-04 22:01:09",
"Total_Number_of_Cores": "8",
"Username": "Professor Frink",
"FileVault_2_Status": "Encrypted",
"JSS_Computer_ID": "2",
"Number_of_Available_Updates": "1",
"Model_Identifier": "MacBookPro16,1",
"Operating_System": "Mac OS X 10.15.7",
"Model": "MacBook Pro (16-inch, 2019)",
"MAC_Address": "12:34:56:78:9A:BC",
"Serial_Number": "C02K2ND8CMF1",
"Email_Address": "frink@hoyvin-glavin.com",
"IP_Address": "10.0.1.42",
"FileVault_Status": "1/1",
"Processor_Type": "Intel Core i9",
"Processor_Speed_MHz": "2457",
"Total_RAM_MB": "65536"
}

Now let’s say the privacy standards for this place is GDPR on steroids and all personally identifiable information must be removed, including serials, IPs, UUIDs, almost everything (but you don’t want to run the report again because it took ages to get the output)!

Here’s what that command would look like: jpt -o replace -v '"REDACTED"' -p '$["advanced_computer_search"]["computers"][*]["name","udid","Username","Computer_Name","MAC_Address","Serial_Number","Email_Address","IP_Address"]' ./advancedcomputersearch-2-raw.json

Here’s what that same computer looks like in the resulting output (as well as all others in the document):

  {
    "name": "REDACTED",
    "udid": "REDACTED",
    "Managed": "Managed",
    "id": 2,
    "Computer_Name": "REDACTED",
    "Architecture_Type": "i386",
    "Make": "Apple",
    "Service_Pack": "",
    "Last_Inventory_Update": "2020-11-04 22:01:09",
    "Active_Directory_Status": "Not Bound",
    "Total_Number_of_Cores": "8",
    "Username": "REDACTED",
    "FileVault_2_Status": "Encrypted",
    "JSS_Computer_ID": "254",
    "Number_of_Available_Updates": "1",
    "Model_Identifier": "MacBookPro16,1",
    "Operating_System": "Mac OS X 10.15.7",
    "Model": "MacBook Pro (16-inch, 2019)",
    "MAC_Address": "REDACTED",
    "Serial_Number": "REDACTED",
    "Email_Address": "REDACTED",
    "IP_Address": "REDACTED",
    "FileVault_Status": "1/1",
    "Processor_Type": "Intel Core i9",
    "Processor_Speed_MHz": "2457",
    "Total_RAM_MB": "65536"
  }

What we did was use the -o replace operation with a -v <value> of the JSON string "REDACTED" to all the paths matched by the JSONPath union expression (the comma separated property names in brackets) of the -p option. JSON Pointer can only act on one value at a time, this is where JSONPath can save you time and really shines.

jpt is fast because WebKit’s JavascriptCore engine is fast, for instance there is a larger version of that search that has 15,999 computers, it took only 11 seconds to redact every record.

jpt -l $.advanced_computer_search.computers ./advancedcomputersearch.json
15999

time jpt -o replace -v '"REDACTED"' -p '$.advanced_computer_search.computers[*]["name","udid","Username","Computer_Name","MAC_Address","Serial_Number","Email_Address","IP_Address"]' ./advancedcomputersearch.json > /dev/null 

11.14s user 0.35s system 104% cpu 11.030 total

Put Smart Computer Groups on a diet

When you download Smart Groups via the API, you will also get an array of all the computers objects that match at that moment in time. If you just want to back up the logic or upload to another system, you don’t want all those computers in there.

Sample file: smartgroup-1-raw.json

{
  "computer_group": {
    "id": 12,
    "name": "All 10.15.x Macs",
    "is_smart": true,
    "site": {
      "id": -1,
      "name": "None"
    },
    "criteria": [
      {
        "name": "Operating System Version",
        "priority": 0,
        "and_or": "and",
        "search_type": "like",
        "value": "10.15",
        "opening_paren": false,
        "closing_paren": false
      }
    ],
    "computers": [
      {
        "id": 1,
        "name": "mac1",
        "mac_address": "12:34:56:78:9A:BC",
        "alt_mac_address": "12:34:56:78:9A:BD",
        "serial_number": "Z18D132XJTQD"
      },
      {
        "id": 2,
        "name": "mac2",
        "mac_address": "12:34:56:78:9A:BE",
        "alt_mac_address": "12:34:56:78:9A:BF",
        "serial_number": "Z39VM86X01MZ"
      }
    ]
  }
}

Lets’ remove those computers with jpt and the JSON Patch remove operartion:
jpt -o remove -p '$.computer_group.computers' ./smartgroup-1-raw.json

Since the target is a single property name, JSON Pointer can also be used:
jpt -o remove -p /computer_group/computers ./smartgroup-1-raw.json

{
  "computer_group": {
    "id": 12,
    "name": "All 10.15.x Macs",
    "is_smart": true,
    "site": {
      "id": -1,
      "name": "None"
    },
    "criteria": [
      {
        "name": "Operating System Version",
        "priority": 0,
        "and_or": "and",
        "search_type": "like",
        "value": "10.15",
        "opening_paren": false,
        "closing_paren": false
      }
    ]
  }
}

Further Uses

Using only JSON Patch replace and remove operations this JSON could have its id removed to prep it for an API POST on another JSS to create a new group or the name and value could be modified in a looping script to create multiple JSON files for every macOS version. The jpt is flexible enough to handle most anything you throw at it, whether you are using the standalone version or have embedded it in your scripts.

Stop by the jpt GitHub page to get your copy

secret origins: the jpt

On building a JSON tool for macOS without using Python, perl, or Ruby.

In my work as a Macintosh engineer and administrator I’ve noticed macOS has lacked a bundled tool for working with JSON at the command line. Where XML has its xpath, if your shell script needs some JSON chops, it’ll require an external binary like jq or something else scripted in Python, Ruby or perl using their JSON modules. The problem is, those runtimes have been slated for removal from a future macOS. So I took that as challenge to devise a method to query and modify JSON data within shell scripts, that didn’t use one of those deprecated scripting runtimes and didn’t require an external binary dependency either. Could I achieve robust and native JSON parsing on a Mac by simply “living off the land”?

Why not just re-install the runtimes when Apple deprecates them?

“Why limit yourself like this? Just re-install the runtimes and move on”, you may ask. Well, I’d like to think that limitations can inspire creativity but we should also consider there may be some other reasons why Apple is discontinuing the inclusion of those runtimes. Some may say, “Apple Silicon + macOS 11.0 is the perfect time for them to clean house”, to which I’d have to agree that’s a very good reason and likely a factor. Others could say they are looking to tighten the screws to keep out unsigned code: maybe, they do like to glue things shut! But really, I think it’s more akin to the web-plugins of yore like Java and Flash. Apple does not want to be the conduit for deploying 3rd party party runtimes which increase the attack surface of macOS. This seems like the most reasonable of the explanations. So, if you accept that Apple is attempting to reduce attack surface, why increase it by re-installing Python, Ruby, or perl, just so a transient script (like a Jamf Extension Attribute) can parse a JSON file? My answer to that, is you don’t. You play the hand you’re dealt. Game on!

Looking for truffles (in a very small back yard)

Despite having another project (shui) that can output and invoke Applescript from within a shell scripts for generating user interfaces, I definitely knew that Applescript was not the way to go. Apple however, added to the languages Open Scripting Architecture (OSA) supports back in 2014 with OS X Yosemite (10.10), they added Javascript along with a bridge to the Cocoa Objective-C classes and they called it JXA: Javascript for Automation. This seemed like a promising place, so I started playing with osascript and figured out how to load files and read /dev/stdin using JXA, and while looking for an answer for garbled input from stdin I came upon a Japanese blog that mentioned jsc the JavaScriptCore binary which resides in the /System/Library/Frameworks/ JavaScriptCore.framework. Arigato! Pay dirt! 🤑 jsc does exactly what we need it to do: It can interpret Javascript passed as an argument, can access the filesystem and read from /dev/stdin, and best of all is in non-Private System level Framework that exists all the way back to OS X 10.4! Just the kind of foundation on which to build the tool.

Homesteading jsc

The existence of jsc goes back all the way to OS X Tiger and it’s functionality has evolved over the years. In order to have a consistent experience in jpt from macOS 10.4 – 11.x+ a few polyfills had to be employed for missing functions, along with a few other workarounds regarding file loading, printing and exit codes (or lack thereof). Once those were addressed the jsc proved to be a highly optimized Javascript environment that’s blazingly fast. It spans 13 macOS releases and is even present in many Linux distros out-of-the-box (Ubuntu and CentOS) and can even be run on Windows when the Linux Subsytem is installed.

With the host environment sorted, I began working with the original JSONPath code by Stefan Goessner as the query language. I didn’t know about JSON Pointer yet so this strange beast was all I knew! It worked out really. I went full throttle into developing the “swiss army knife” of JSON tools. I really leaned into the Second System Effect, as described in the Mythical Man-month, it’s when you put every doodad, gizmo and doo-hicky in your 2nd product (my first simple JSON pretty-printer built in JS on jsc). Eventually though, after I reached a feature plateau, I came back around to the address the quirks of the original JSONPath code. I ended up rewriting signifigant chunks of JSONPath and released it as it’s own project: brunerd JSONPath. But I digress, let’s get back to the JSON Power Tool.

jpt: powers and abilities

At it’s most basic, jpt will format or “pretty print” any JSON given. jpt can also handle data retrieval from JSON document using either JSONPath or JSON Pointer syntax. JSONPath, while not a standard, is a highly expressive query language akin to XPath for XML, with poweful features like recursive search, filter expressions, slices, and unions. JSON Pointer on the other hand is narrower in focus, succint and easily expressed, and standardized but it does not offer any of the interogative features that I feel make JSONPath so intriguing. Finally, jpt can also modify values in a JSON document using standardized JSON Patch operations like: add, remove, replace, copy, move, and test, as well as the also standardized JSON Merge Patch operation. Altogether, the jpt can format, retrieve and alter JSON documents using only a bit of outer shell script plus a lot more Javascript on any macOS since 10.4! 😅

Where can I get the jpt?

Stop by the project’s GitHub page at: https://github.com/brunerd/jpt

There you will find the full source and also a minified version of the jpt for inclusion within your shell scripts. Since it’s never compiled you can always peer inside and learn from it, customize it, modify it, or just tinker around with it (usually the best teacher).

Future Plans

There will undoubtedly be continued work on the jpt. Surely there are less than optimal routines, un-idiomatic idioms, edge cases not found, and features yet to be realized. But as far as the core functionality goes though, it’s fairly feature complete in my opinion. Considering that one of my top 10 StrengthsFinder qualities is “Maximizer”, the odds are pretty good, I’ll keep honing the jpt‘s utility, size (smaller), and sharing more articles with examples on the kinds of queries and data alteration operations the jpt can so perform. Stay tuned!